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Deposit Insurance Coverage

The more you know, the safer your money.

The FDIC – short for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation – is an independent agency of the United States government. FDIC coverage protects you against the loss of your deposits if an FDIC-insured bank or savings association fails. FDIC insurance is backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government.

All FDIC-insured banks must meet high standards for financial strength and stability. The FDIC, with other federal and state regulatory agencies, regularly reviews the operations of insured banks to ensure these standards are met.

The FDIC insures all deposits, including checking, NOW and savings accounts, money market deposit accounts, and certificates of deposit (CDs), up to the insurance limit.

On July 21, 2010, the deposit insurance coverage for all deposit accounts was permanently raised to $250,000 per depositor, per insured depository institution for each account ownership category. Insurance coverage for certain retirement accounts, which include all IRA deposit accounts, was increased permanently to $250,000 per depositor in 2006.

The insurance product or annuity is not a deposit or other obligation of, or guaranteed by, the bank or an affiliate of the bank; is not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other agency of the United States, the bank, or (if applicable) an affiliate of the bank; and In the case of an insurance product or annuity that involves an investment risk, there is investment risk associated with the product, including the possible loss of value.