Employees impacted for various reasons related to the coronavirus pandemic are now eligible for paid sick leave and expanded medical and family leave through Dec. 31, 2020. Under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, employers must provide qualifying employees with up to two weeks of paid sick leave. In general, eligible employees include people working for small businesses with fewer than 500 workers, as well as certain public sector workers. People employed for at least 30 days before their leave request also may qualify for an additional 10 weeks of partially paid leave if they are caring for a child whose school or day care is closed due to the coronavirus. Generally, full-time workers taking leave are entitled to sick pay of up to 80 hours at either their regular rate, or the applicable state or federal minimum wage, whichever is higher. If the employee is unable to work or telework, they are paid based on the following guidelines: - Two weeks, up to 80 hours, of paid sick leave at 100% of the employee’s regular pay if they are subject to a quarantine or isolation order; if they have been advised by their health-care provider to self-quarantine; or if they are seeking a diagnosis for coronavirus symptoms. - Two weeks, up to 80 hours, of paid sick leave at two-thirds the employee’s regular pay if they are unable to work because of a need to care for a quarantined individual or someone experiencing a similar condition; or whose school or child care provider is closed or unavailable for reasons related to coronavirus. - Individuals who have been employed for at least 30 calendar days, may receive up to an additional 10 weeks of paid expanded family and medical leave at two-thirds pay if they are caring for a child whose school or day care is closed or unavailable. Leave for eligible part-time employees is based on the number of hours they are normally scheduled to work over that period. If it would threaten the viability of their business, small businesses with fewer than 50 employees could be exempt from the requirement to provide leave if schools close or child care is unavailable. Where leave is foreseeable, employees should notify their employers about their situation and should know that the employers might require them to provide certain information to continue receiving sick time pay. For detailed information, visit the U.S. Department of Labor website at dol.gov.